Jump to content

  • Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

18-135mm now in stock!

Fuji USA Specials - EXTENDED! PLUS: 14mm, 23mm, 35mm specials coming soon!

Welcome to Fuji X Forum!

Welcome to the Fuji X Forum, the largest online community of Fujifilm X camera users!

Creating a forum account is FREE!

The primary benefit to registering is so you can post in the community, and be notified when discussions are updated.

Other benefits include uploading photos, creating a photo gallery, getting answers to technical questions and assistance with trouble-shooting, communicate with other members via private messages, elgibility for contests, and more!

Registering is a simple process that requires minimal information. Become a part of the forum by signing in or creating an account. For your convenience you can sign in using Facebook, Twitter or Google.

We take pride in being the friendliest photo forum on the net.

Come on in join the fun!
Guest Message by DevFuse
 

Photo

Kipon tilt ring on X-Pro1 - first results

X-Pro1

  • You cannot start a new topic
  • Please log in to reply
23 replies to this topic

#1 rdelbar

rdelbar

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 149 posts
  • Local time: 01:55 AM
  • LocationNear Antwerp, Belgium

Posted 05 September 2012 - 01:53 PM

I now own the full set of Kipon adapter rings for Nikon F-mount lenses: the 'original' one for lenses with their own aperture ring (left), the more recent 'G-type' one supporting AF-S (and DX) lenses (right), one with shift capabilities (middle left) and one with tilt capabilities (middle right). I also acquired an adapter ring for Leica 39mm screw mount lenses, as I have a few pre-WWII lenses from my grandfather (bottom center).

original.jpg


I am working at a comprehensive and detailed review to appear on my

Please Login or Register to see this Hidden Content

. This takes me longer than I hoped for, with so many other things to do...
But as I know some friends here are waiting impatiently to see some results - specifically with the tilt adapter - I present some quick first impressions and test shots.
They are far from perfect, but should give you an idea of what to expect.

The Kipon tilt adapter ring accepts any Nikon F-mount lens, but provides no diaphragm control for G-type lenses that do not have an aperture ring.

The lens mounted onto the adapter can be titled to a maximum of about 8 degrees in any direction. You simply turn the chrome ring, with its two small handles, counterclockwise (as seen from the front) to loosen the swivel mount, move the lens to the desired position, and then lock it into place by turning clockwise. It is possible to semi-fix a lightweight lens so you can still adjust its position by applying some gentle force (I don't know whether that's a good idea from a mechanical viewpoint).
There is no reference or numerical indication of the tilt angle, nor any assistance to reproduce an earlier setting. That makes the adapter more suitable for creative use, and less for technical work (e.g. product photography).

large.jpg


I made a few quick test shots with my trusted AF- Nikkor 35mm f/2.0D lens. The animation gives you an idea of the range of lens movement.

original.jpg


All images below were shot on tripod, using aperture priority mode, and set at f/2.8 so the differences in depth-of-field (DOF) become very clear.
The images were captured as JPEGs, all settings to normal/neutral, with just a little fine-tuning of white balance, tone, contrast and clarity in Lightroom 4; nothing out of the ordinary. They were resized to 900 pixels wide.

To start, a shot of the front wall of my house, with no tilt applied. Focus was smack in the middle of the image. Up close and way back areas are clearly out of focus.
Note that the plants in the bottom right look rather sharp as well, as they are at about the same distance from camera as the focus point on the wall. Remember: in normal conditions, the plane of focus is perpendicular to the shooting axis.

original.jpg



Next, I applied a swing (as purists will call a tilt in horizontal direction) of about 4-5 degrees to the left, i.e. towards the wall. The plane of focus now runs along the wall, and we see a sharp zone from close by all the way to the end.
Remember, we are still at f/2.8! No change in focus distance (that would by the way influence the position of the plane of focus).
Also note that the above mentioned plants are now no longer sharp, as they do no longer fall along the plane of focus.
Closing the aperture would have restored some (but most likely not enough) DOF, with the DOF zone now running parallel to the plane of focus (those who have studied the Scheimpflug rules in detail will forgive me this simplification).

original.jpg



Finally, a shot with maximum swing in the opposite direction, i.e. to the right, away from the wall. The plane of focus now runs at a steep angle to the wall, reducing the DOF zone to a small vertical slice through the middle of the image.
The small pink flowers at the very bottom become somewhat sharp, that gives you a hint of where the plane of focus runs.
We can use this anti-Scheimpflug effect to creatively reduce the DOF. This approach is well-known as the ‘fake miniature’ method.

original.jpg



Let’s look at a second example, this time with a vertical tilt. The first shot has the lens back in ‘neutral’ position, still at f/2.8.
The camera is about 60cm above ground level. Focus point is on the tree trunk near the back. The foreground is clearly unsharp, the far background not much better.

original.jpg



Applying a ca. 2-3 degree tilt downwards, the plane of focus now slopes gently upwards, from about ground level nearby up to the top of the bush left from the tree.
Both foreground and background are in focus: we get a very extensive DOF zone, and that at f/2.8!
Note that the bottoms of the plants sticking up at left are sharp (this area falls on the plane of focus) whereas their tops are not (as they reach way above the plane of focus).

original.jpg


And to close: another creative shot with maximum tilt upwards. Focus was set on the bush with the small white flowers, in the middle.

original.jpg



As said before, the Kipon tilt adapter is not a tool for very precise and controlled photography. If that is what you are looking for, get a 'real' tilt/shift lens, and probably use a full-frame DSLR as well.
But if you are looking to explore creative ways to manipulate DOF, or want to understand-by-doing how tilt and swing effects behave, this very affordable gadget will bring you a lot of fun.
Providing you have a couple of good old prime lenses around, of course.

More to come later, I will keep you posted on this forum.


Edited by Arjay, 30 June 2013 - 11:34 PM.
Moved thread to the Adapted Lenses forum section.

  • K9GDT - George, Skulmoski, Jannie and 1 other like this

#2 jknights

jknights

    Moderator

  • Moderators
  • 5,431 posts
  • Local time: 01:55 AM
  • LocationOliva, Valencia, Spain

Posted 05 September 2012 - 03:16 PM

Rene,
Thanks for posting these results.
Fantastic, I cant wait for my shift and tilt adapters to arrive.

You say these were taken with the 35mm f2.0 AF lens, I look forward to seeing how the results compare when taken with a 24mm f2.8
When I get my adapter I will try with the 20mm f2.8 AF.
Always Nikon and Fuji cameras.

Still learning after all these years!
Website http://www.jmknights.com


#3 mfphotography

mfphotography

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 195 posts
  • Local time: 07:55 PM

Posted 05 September 2012 - 03:19 PM

Excellent review. Thanks for doing this.

I just got my Kipon M42-XF Tilt Adapter, which I plan to use with my Fujinon 28 f/3.5 EBC lens. Can't wait to give it a go!

#4 AusPhotoHiker

AusPhotoHiker

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 882 posts
  • Local time: 09:25 AM
  • LocationAustralia

Posted 05 September 2012 - 04:54 PM

As said before, the Kipon tilt adapter is not a tool for very precise and controlled photography. If that is what you are looking for, get a 'real' tilt/shift lens, and probably use a full-frame DSLR as well.
But if you are looking to explore creative ways to manipulate DOF, or want to understand-by-doing how tilt and swing effects behave, this very affordable gadget will bring you a lot of fun.
Providing you have a couple of good old prime lenses around, of course.


Excellent commentary and examples, thank you.

Can you comment on the usability in the field? Is it easy to assess the image in the EVF to adjust focus plane positioning, or do you need to use the rear display?

Cheers, Mike.

 

X-Pro1 X-T1 14 18 27 35 60 18-55 50-230


#5 demonicangelz

demonicangelz

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 40 posts
  • Local time: 07:55 AM

Posted 06 September 2012 - 03:59 AM

Great review so far! Looking forward to more.

#6 rdelbar

rdelbar

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 149 posts
  • Local time: 01:55 AM
  • LocationNear Antwerp, Belgium

Posted 06 September 2012 - 04:11 AM

Can you comment on the usability in the field? Is it easy to assess the image in the EVF to adjust focus plane positioning, or do you need to use the rear display?

Mike,

The EVF will give you a pretty good view on focus across the image as long as you use it within its known operating boundaries: not too much ambient light to stray into the viewpiece, and some parts of the image containing good edges or areas with contrast.

The tough part comes when you try to move the lens position while looking through the EVF. Unless the lens sits rather loose (OK for creative low-DOF shots) that will be fine, otherwise the gentle force you have to apply will distract you from holding the camera in position.
If the tilt angle is preset and locked in, thinks become a lot easier.

I am wearing progressive glasses, and my +2 diopter correction choice is already a compromise between OVF and EVF use, so I am not an ideal candidate to heavily rely on EVF for fine focusing.

For precise work I prefer working from the LCD - it's like operating a view camera then. I put the camera on a sturdy tripod, switch on the GRID 24 framing guide and zoom in on various parts of the image for exact focus appreciation and adjustment.The 3x maginifaction option announced for the 2.0 firmware release will be a welcome addition. Too bad Fuji's engineers did not allow the zoom-in point to be moved via the directional pad while in magnified mode (like possible during image review, or with Nikon DSLRs)...

#7 AusPhotoHiker

AusPhotoHiker

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 882 posts
  • Local time: 09:25 AM
  • LocationAustralia

Posted 06 September 2012 - 04:18 AM

Thanks Rene, thanks for the explanation.

If I decide to go down this track, it will be with a tripod, I can't imagine going through tilt setup handheld, but clearly it is possible.

Sounds like I would need to pack an extra battery with the tilt adapter and lens, the LCD sounds the way to go.

Cheers

Cheers, Mike.

 

X-Pro1 X-T1 14 18 27 35 60 18-55 50-230


#8 jknights

jknights

    Moderator

  • Moderators
  • 5,431 posts
  • Local time: 01:55 AM
  • LocationOliva, Valencia, Spain

Posted 06 September 2012 - 06:35 AM

Thanks Rene, thanks for the explanation.

If I decide to go down this track, it will be with a tripod, I can't imagine going through tilt setup handheld, but clearly it is possible.

Sounds like I would need to pack an extra battery with the tilt adapter and lens, the LCD sounds the way to go.

Cheers


Yes, I'd agree.

With the tilt feature I cant image using it with anything other than a tripod and using the back screen for fine tuning the focus unless you are a contortionist!.
Always Nikon and Fuji cameras.

Still learning after all these years!
Website http://www.jmknights.com


#9 AsylumPhoto

AsylumPhoto

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 630 posts
  • Local time: 06:55 PM

Posted 06 September 2012 - 07:35 AM

This is semi related... I've been wanting to get a Lensbaby Composer, but they don't make it for the XF mount... any suggestions on which + Kipon adapter I should get?

#10 demonicangelz

demonicangelz

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 40 posts
  • Local time: 07:55 AM

Posted 06 September 2012 - 08:56 AM

This is semi related... I've been wanting to get a Lensbaby Composer, but they don't make it for the XF mount... any suggestions on which + Kipon adapter I should get?

If you got a Nikon mount lens baby then a normal F adapter will do. If you have more G lenses then get the G mount.
Either is fine. I'd suppose if you get the shift mount then you'd have a pseudo tilt shift lens!

#11 jknights

jknights

    Moderator

  • Moderators
  • 5,431 posts
  • Local time: 01:55 AM
  • LocationOliva, Valencia, Spain

Posted 07 September 2012 - 09:33 AM

If you have Nikon or Canon then see here.

Please Login or Register to see this Hidden Content


Always Nikon and Fuji cameras.

Still learning after all these years!
Website http://www.jmknights.com


#12 legolize_it

legolize_it

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 49 posts
  • Local time: 01:55 AM

Posted 26 February 2013 - 12:06 PM

Rdelbar, thank you very much for sharing such a detailed overview!



#13 svx94

svx94

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 66 posts
  • Local time: 05:55 PM
  • LocationMN

Posted 31 March 2013 - 04:15 PM

That's really helpful info, Thanks for sharing!

 

What's your experience on the Shift adapter and the G lens adapter?



#14 apsphoto

apsphoto

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 744 posts
  • Local time: 04:55 PM
  • LocationOrange county , CA

Posted 31 March 2013 - 11:06 PM

Since I don't have any Nikon lenses this is something that I will not be trying anytime soon. To me it would seem the tilt would be more useful than shift, but I understand the uses for both. The one thing that is really interesting me at the moment is waiting for the Samyang tilt and shift for Canon that is coming out soon. With a Fuji adapter, here is a lens that is manual aperture control and manual focus and will have tilt and shift in one package for a somewhat reasonable price. Also Samyang optics have generally been pretty good. Can hardly wait till they start shipping them and tilt and shift control here we come for Fuji.... :rolleyes:

 

Alan



#15 Topsy

Topsy

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 787 posts
  • Local time: 12:55 AM
  • LocationDevon

Posted 01 April 2013 - 02:49 AM

Thanks for sharing this rdelbar, it was a very interesting article which although I don't have any nikon lenses I enjoyed the learning experience.



#16 gobeatty

gobeatty

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 229 posts
  • Local time: 07:55 PM

Posted 01 April 2013 - 12:00 PM

Yes, I'd agree.

With the tilt feature I cant image using it with anything other than a tripod and using the back screen for fine tuning the focus unless you are a contortionist!.


I could. If I was walking around a flower garden, I could set the tilt to plane focus across the the flower beds and make a series walking around the garden. Much the same as switching to a macro lens and strolling the garden looking for good close ups. Just a thought.

#17 Jannie

Jannie

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 574 posts
  • Local time: 04:55 PM
  • LocationSeattle, WA

Posted 30 June 2013 - 03:51 PM

rdelbar I  looked at your blog, you do amazing work with that 14mm, were you using a shift adapter, correcting some lines in LR or was it all that lens's abilities to have so little parallax?  Either way, really, really beautiful interiors and you're black and white with the 18-55 is wonderful too. But I concur with you, I love a 35 equivalent lens as my wide angle, but the 14/eq21 lens has my eye. It's just that I really have loved in the past on my full frame camera to shoot a 35mm when working close to people, not just faces but upper body. Getting up close to someone out there on the floor dancing with a 35mm equivalent lens is just really neat. I'm tempted to get the short zoom but to be honest it's all still too new to me, but I'm assuming that this is going to be my go to camera for the rest of my years shooting. 



#18 rdelbar

rdelbar

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 149 posts
  • Local time: 01:55 AM
  • LocationNear Antwerp, Belgium

Posted 01 July 2013 - 04:21 AM

Jannie, I used just the standard Fuji XF 14mm lens, no adapters whatsoever.

 

I used LR4.4 for post-processing. With respect to the images in my March 13 blog post, the amounts of vertical correction applied were -49, +21, 0, -14, +3, 0. 0, -3, +17 and +5 respectively.
 
I try to avoid big perspective corrections by thinking carefully while shooting how to hold the camera (even when I shoot without tripod, as was the case on this trip).
When the situation forces me to tilt the camera, I will frame with extra room to compensate for the crop after correction (e.g. with the #9 stairway picture), or try to use the convergence creatively (as with shots #6 and #7).
 
I have posted about my results of the various tilt/shift/T&S adapters on various Fuji X forums, and plan to eventually publish a thorough discussion on my blog.


#19 tony-s

tony-s

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 80 posts
  • Local time: 05:55 PM

Posted 02 July 2013 - 10:38 AM

I'm having trouble finding the shift or tilt adapters for Canon FD lenses. I suspect they are not available? 



#20 Ilovemycam

Ilovemycam

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 222 posts
  • Local time: 07:55 PM
  • LocationUSA

Posted 19 September 2013 - 03:12 PM

Any updates to this thread?

How are tilt shift effects for street work?

I have yet to see a good street shot done with one. I am looking for the miniaturization effect, not building perspective.

#21 fer_fdi

fer_fdi

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 55 posts
  • Local time: 01:55 AM
  • LocationBarcelona + Empordà, Spain

Posted 20 September 2013 - 05:29 PM

This is semi related... I've been wanting to get a Lensbaby Composer, but they don't make it for the XF mount... any suggestions on which + Kipon adapter I should get?

 

Not the same : ) but I've seen a great implementation made with a good enlarger lens and a piece of vacuum tube that was screwed on a body cap. The tube can move freely, compress and expand.

DIY Tilt/shift and macro. Vacuumbaby Cleanposer :P

It is somewhere in Flickr. I'll post a link when I find it again

 

 

Thank you rdelbar for the lovely review!


Edited by fer_fdi, 20 September 2013 - 05:34 PM.

Fer


#22 cdp8

cdp8

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 156 posts
  • Local time: 04:55 PM
  • LocationSoCal

Posted 08 July 2014 - 02:32 PM

I now own the full set of Kipon adapter rings for Nikon F-mount lenses: the 'original' one for lenses with their own aperture ring (left), the more recent 'G-type' one supporting AF-S (and DX) lenses (right), one with shift capabilities (middle left) and one with tilt capabilities (middle right). I also acquired an adapter ring for Leica 39mm screw mount lenses, as I have a few pre-WWII lenses from my grandfather (bottom center).

...

More to come later, I will keep you posted on this forum.

 

 

Rdelbar, Have you used the tilt adapter with a X-E2 or X-T1 with the color focus peaking? How well does it work?



#23 Sebouille

Sebouille

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts
  • Local time: 12:55 AM
  • LocationFrance

Posted 09 July 2014 - 10:27 AM

Hello rdelbar,

 

Thank you for your excellent review. The existence of tilt adapters - at an extremely cheap price compared to genuine tilt/shift lenses - is one of the reason that made me switch from DSLR to mirrorless. I have an X-E2 from 2 weeks.

 

I also ordered a tilt adapter, also a Kipon but built differently. Indeed, on the ebay picture, I noticed what looked like grease traces, which were a little bit worrying.

 

For my point of view, the most interesting use of the tilted lens doesn't need a tripod. It main goal is to mess our usual perception of depth of field, wich produces interesting and artfull pictures. "fake miniature" use is only one part of what can be done with that

Some examples may be found in the "Rolleiflex SL66 TILT!" flickr group.

For example :

Please Login or Register to see this Hidden Content

or also (from my production) :

Please Login or Register to see this Hidden Content

 

I can't wait for my own tilt adapter



#24 rdelbar

rdelbar

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 149 posts
  • Local time: 01:55 AM
  • LocationNear Antwerp, Belgium

Posted 14 July 2014 - 07:48 AM

cdp8: focus peaking is a great help in all manual focus applications, and definitely also here. The use of color only improves the assistance. I also find the tiltable screen on the X-T1 a big plus when working on a tripod.







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: X-Pro1

0 user(s) are browsing this forum

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users