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XPro1 in sub zero climate


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17 replies to this topic

#1 AusPhotoHiker

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 05:07 AM

Hi,

Just got back from a trip into the Central Plateau region of Tasmania, all 1200m+. We were camped and the nights all went sub zero [C] but probably not below -4C. (the water on the ground was frozen first thing in the morning)

The X-Pro1 was in my daypack and a couple of the nights it sat in the vestibule of my tent, so must have been close to ambient when I took it out to take dawn shots each day. On the days it was left in the vestibule, it took a couple of tries to get it to fire up - when flicking the switch to 'on' it would make a noise from the lens as it normally does on power up, but the VF would remain blank and the camera would not respond to any controls. Turning it off and then on again resulted in a normal usable camera.

After the first experience of this, I brought the camera inside the tent at night and it was fine the next morning. I left it in the vestibule one more night to see if the problem was temperature related, and it played up again the following morning.

Interested to hear if anyone else has seen this behaviour?



#2 M4cr0s

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 05:40 AM

I've seen that behavior in room temperature too, especially when the battery is starting to run low which could be similar to a cold battery. Likely the battery isn't able to quite output the juice needed to boot the camera up so it hangs before it comes to turning the screen on, but it still manages to complete some of the steps in the booting process. Most likely the camera needs a little more power when booting than when running, so there you go. Since the first booting attempt have generated a little heat in the battery and got the internal chemistry working, it could be fine on the next attempt.

Mac



#3 artuk

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 10:29 AM

I know the general advice for cold weather is to keep the camera, and particularly the batteries, somewhere warm (like inside your coat) until needed.

I am sure you are aware of the issues of taking a camera from a cold to a warm environment, and vice versa.



#4 fearofhummingbird

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 11:52 AM

Lithium battery chemistry is least impacted by cold weather relative to other commercially available formulations. That's why Li batteries are favored by mountaineers for their night lights.



#5 TropicalYankee

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 12:45 PM

I know the general advice for cold weather is to keep the camera, and particularly the batteries, somewhere warm (like inside your coat) until needed.

I am sure you are aware of the issues of taking a camera from a cold to a warm environment, and vice versa.


This advice is a misnomer. When you shoot in weather below freezing, once your camera is in the cold, you should keep it there. Bringing a camera that is cold into your parka will introduce moisture due to condensation when going from a cold dry environment to a warm moist one. When you bring the camera back out into the cold you risk the moisture freezing in the camera before it evaporates.

The best thing to do is to bring fully charged extra batteries. As said earlier Li-on batts are favored over other types in cold weather. While Fuji says 0°C, you're probably safe down to -8° to —10°C where you rick the LCD freezing. There may also be an issue with the viscosity of the lubricants in the lenses at these temps.

#6 kufel

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 01:47 PM

Operating temperature low limit at 0 degrees Celsius is part of specs for every camera nowadays, including Canon 7D and 1 series cameras. I was able to shoot at -30 degrees Celsius without any problems using 1DmkII and 7D and LCD did not freeze. Main issue is batteries, have 2 or 3 with you in sub-zero conditions and keep switching them between the camera and the pocket close to your body


This advice is a misnomer. When you shoot in weather below freezing, once your camera is in the cold, you should keep it there. Bringing a camera that is cold into your parka will introduce moisture due to condensation when going from a cold dry environment to a warm moist one. When you bring the camera back out into the cold you risk the moisture freezing in the camera before it evaporates.

The best thing to do is to bring fully charged extra batteries. As said earlier Li-on batts are favored over other types in cold weather. While Fuji says 0°C, you're probably safe down to -8° to —10°C where you rick the LCD freezing. There may also be an issue with the viscosity of the lubricants in the lenses at these temps.



#7 esromorse

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 02:29 PM

I was wandering around in poland in the snow for a couple of hours last week taking pics and it was supposed to be -7. camera slowed a little, but no more than my hands and brain did! (i am from Brisbane, Australia though so have never been anywhere near that cold before haha)
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#8 kufel

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 02:40 PM

Once the over-advertised Canadian winter kicks in I will try to get some real sub-zero action frozen ( :) ) in the images


I was wandering around in poland in the snow for a couple of hours last week taking pics and it was supposed to be -7. camera slowed a little, but no more than my hands and brain did! (i am from Brisbane, Australia though so have never been anywhere near that cold before haha)
Posted Image



#9 AusPhotoHiker

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 03:26 PM

I know the general advice for cold weather is to keep the camera, and particularly the batteries, somewhere warm (like inside your coat) until needed.

I am sure you are aware of the issues of taking a camera from a cold to a warm environment, and vice versa.


Yes, fully aware of the issues with condensation, which is one of the reasons I generally keep the camera close to ambient when out hiking. Keeping the camera warm in a cold environment is asking for trouble IMO.

The temperature difference between the vestibule and the inside of my tent would only be a few degrees at most, so on colder trips even bringing the camera inside the tent may not solve the problem. I could put the whole camera inside my sleeping bag at night, but that approach is likely to bring other problems with condensation. I have used the sleeping bag trick to dry out a dead and water soaked camera with success though.

Next trip, I will keep the spare batteries with me in the sleeping bag and see how things go then.

#10 jknights

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 05:02 PM

I think the best option is to keep just the batteries in a warm place.

Lion batteries should operate happily in the -10C to 40C range but with reduced output if temperature is below 0C.In fact the Lion batteries tend to work down to -20C but this is the limit of their designed operational temperature.



#11 cloose

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 05:04 PM

I have shot with my X-Pro1 at -24C with no issues. The coldest that I have ever shot with any camera was with a Canon 1DIII @ -35C; again with no issues. (It's been in a suitcase at -40C and colder temperatures, however was not used at this)

Long story short, don't be afraid to use the camera. As mentioned above, just be sure to bring several batteries!

The user will most likely succumb to cold before the camera will.



#12 jknights

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 05:04 PM

Mike try a trip to Snowy Mountains next winter up on Mt. Kosi it gets very cold!!



#13 AusPhotoHiker

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 06:22 PM

jknights, yes it does :)

I was in Falls Creek in July but the camera does not get as cold in the Ski Lodge as it does in the tent. :)

Tasmania being a lot further south (~42 degrees vs ~36 degrees) and subject to the roaring fourties, gets very cold, especially in the central plateau.

Definitely not as cold as -24C or -35C though! :)



#14 15k

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Posted 22 November 2012 - 01:00 PM

I live in Moscow :D :D :D
-15C is not something unusual
Posted Image
Some advices for -10C (now it is warm November in Moscow: +5C - -5C not a problem for x-pro1 at all):
1. Take any camera case with you (you need it later). Camera must be under your coat not in the case! Take it out to make a picture, and then put it back under your coat (not a problem with x-pro1 at all, I remember DSLR with 70-200 2,8 under my coat - I was like a pregnant cow!).
2. You need extra battery!!! Main problem - in sub zero temp: battery loses charge very-very quickly! Extra battery you must carry in your SHIRT pocket (in warm place).
3. If some snow falls on your camera never try to blow it away, use your glove or cold cloth (from external pocket) because camera is cold and your warm breath can turn some snow to water, which immediately froze inside, you can't see it, but later it'll became in to water.
4. After all, when you return to the warm place, take a case and put camera in. it must became warmer slowly, or you recive a lot of condensate water in your camera.

P.s. I used a lot of cameras in winter (Nikons: d5000, d7000, d300s, d3s, Canon 5d2) best of the best for winter is Nikon d7000 an hour or two in -10C - -15C not incide a coat at all is possible!!! Don't know about d800 and d600 if they have same sort of battery - may be...



#15 AusPhotoHiker

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Posted 22 November 2012 - 06:51 PM

Thanks for the info and advice 15k.

I'm beginning to think that really cold is probably better than just around freezing point, at least you don't have to deal with rain.

Cheers.