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aspect ratio

Discussion in 'General X Camera Forum' started by fujiphile20, Jan 10, 2017.

  1. fujiphile20

    fujiphile20 New Member

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    I have recently started learning about photography. I noticed L, M and S aspect ratio's on my camera with different aspect ratio's of 3:2, 16:9 and 1:1. I understand the ratio's relate to the dimensions of the photograph which I would use based on my preference. L -->M-->S the megapixel amount of the image decreases from 24 megapixels down to 8 or 6 depending on the camera. My questions are:


    1-So the 'weight' (megapixels) of the picture decreases but the dimensions of the photograph remain the same ?

    2-What do the frames represent ?

    3-Why do the frames increase from L --> M --> S ?

    4-Why would anyone use Small instead of large these days with SD card's being relatively inexpensive?

    Thanks for the help guys-
     
  2. Dirk Offringa

    Dirk Offringa Premium Member

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    Hi

    1: yes for the first half, not really for the second half of your question: "dimension" doesn't mean much without specifying "resolution" (you might look that up on the web)
    2: the number of shots you can store on the current storage media given the filesize you have selected
    3: see 2
    4: for instance, if i'd plan to shoot an event like a party and print postcard-size via wifi on location, I might choose S to speed up the process. There are surely some other reasons... but well, I agree that this is less relevant now than it was a couple of years back
     
  3. DanGleabols

    DanGleabols Well-Known Member

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    1) The dimensions don't stay the same in L->M->S. They get smaller, but the picture stays the same shape, because the ratio between height and width stay the same.

    2 + 3) Which frames?

    4) You'll probably find as you've suggested, very few people will use anything other than L. Reasons to use other sizes may be to squeeze more pics on a card or keep size down to speed up transfer to computer (you don't really need a large file to post on web or facebook or whatever). Theoretically (as I've not tried this) reducing the size of the file could lead to faster processing by the camera, thus speeding it up. There are many different reasons why you would, but generally most people leave it on L.
     
  4. GregWard

    GregWard Premium Member

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    "L, M and S" aren't actually aspect ratios. They refer to the size of the image. As a simplified example - you could have a large image that was 4,000 pixels wide and 3,000 pixels high (so 4000 x 3000 = 12 megapixels). Then a 2,000 by 1,500 medium image (so 3 megapixels) and finally a 1,000 by 750 small image (0.75 megapixels). But note they would all be exactly the same shape (because I simply halved each side).

    Aspect ratio is when you change the shape. So 4,000 x 4,000 is a 1:1 ratio (i.e. square) whereas 4,000 x 3,000 is 4:3 and 4,000 x 2,250 is 16:9.

    Presumably your camera is an X-T2 or an X-Pro2? If so then it, like most mirrorless cameras, will display the aspect ratio you choose in the electronic viewfinder. Try it and you should see the EVF reflecting the aspect ratio you choose in the settings. This can be quite nice as it shows you what you will get and can encourage creativity. The same is true, incidentally, for the Film Simulations including black and white. So if you set 1:1 and ACROS Film Simulation (say) - then you can walk around visualising the world in black and white squares. If you then shoot in RAW and JPEG you will find the JPEG reflects your chosen settings (so B&W and Square or whatever). Depending on what Post Processor you use the RAW file may also look this way. But RAW files are never truly changed - so you can easily revert the RAW file to full resolution/normal aspect ratio/full colour.
     
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  5. Richard_R

    Richard_R Eclectic eccentric

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    For uploading directly to web sites or social media where quality is less a requirement than speed of image loading.
     
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  6. fujiphile20

    fujiphile20 New Member

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    okay, so L,M, S relate to the megapixel size of the photograph. The aspect ratio is the shape of the picture being taken so I could take a picture Large or Small but the same shape (aspect ratio) but, Large would occupy more space on the memory card because of the greater amount of megapixels. As stated someone would take smaller pictures for uploading via wifi or social media. The frame amount increases because the picture has less megapixels and thus can store more on the memory card.


    thanks makes sense, you guys are very helpful
     
  7. Dan Hillier

    Dan Hillier Premium Member

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    Smaller file sizes also make timelapse videos faster to encode. You can also do longer timelapses without changing cards.
     
  8. Shootingstar100660

    Shootingstar100660 Member

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    Probably repeating what's gone before but...
    L,M and S refer to the nimber of pixels used, the fewer pixels, the smaller the file. However, image quality falls with fewer pixels. You would probably use smaller files for things like product images on ebay, facebook etc where quality is not very important and you're not waiting all day for uploading.
    Aspect ratios refer to the width:height proportions. So, if you intend to display images on widescreen TV then choose 16:9. 3:2 is a pretty standard print proportion such as 150x100mm. Square (1:1) is good for avatar pictures such as used here or on facebook etc. There are of course artistic reasons for using these ratios too.
     

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