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Another reason to switch to Electronic Viewfinder.....Dust in DSLR!

Discussion in 'General X Camera Forum' started by Frank Weiser, Jul 7, 2018.

  1. Frank Weiser

    Frank Weiser Premium Member

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    After using my sisters Pentax DSLR the last few days it reminded me once again why I chose Fuji's mirrorless format cameras. DUST and DIRT in the viewfinder. Ughhh...what an ugly site. No more questions like is it the sensor? or the viewfinder?

    Even after spending a half hour cleaning the viewfinder dust particles and dirt would inevitably appear weeks later and the whole cleaning cycle would start over again. And you could never get it all out. So frustrating. So glad I don't have to worry about that anymore :)
     
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  2. jamie allan

    jamie allan Premium Member

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    I started out with Olympus E-series 4/3 DSLRs but changed to Pentax when Olympus moved to m4/3. I spent two years with a K-30 and I've never known a camera to accumulate so much dust in the viewfinder. So much so I replaced the focus screen before I traded it in as it would have depreciated the value markedly.
     
  3. Frank Weiser

    Frank Weiser Premium Member

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    I owned the Pentax K-5 and K-3 so I know what you're talking about. It just makes the whole picture taking experience less than desirable.
     
  4. Carolyn

    Carolyn Premium Member

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    My Nikons were the worst, and hard to clean. One swipe for my Fuji’s and any dust is gone.
     
  5. Frank Weiser

    Frank Weiser Premium Member

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    I know a bit off topic. (My topic). But looking at your equipment list I have a question. I've been approached by our local Ballet company to take photographs of their performers during programs both indoor and out. (I recently sent them photographs I had taken from an outdoor concert of theirs and they apparently were impressed enough that they asked me to do this on a regular basis for them.) Free of course. I wouldn't think of charging them. My question is my best longest indoor lens is the Fuji 90mm and that's the lens I have been using to take their photographs with. Should I consider the Fuji 50-140 as well? I'm thinking OIS and longer reach. But how much IQ would I be degrading from if I failed to use the 90mm? I ask this because you own both.
    thanks.......
     
  6. runswithsizzers

    runswithsizzers Premium Member

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    Funny, but I recently came to the opposite conclusion. After shooting exclusively with my XE2 for a year, I did some film testing, shooting my Pentax K3 dSLR and my old Pentax MX (SLR film camera) in parallel. I was shocked to see how big and bright the Pentax optical viewfinders were compared to the Fuji EVF. IMHO the old Pentax MX viewfinder, dust and all, was the superior instrument for composing the shot, and even more so if manually focusing. That was in good light with a f/1.4 lens mounted. The Fuji EVF is better in dim light with a slow zoom mounted.

    On the other hand, I cursed the old film camera every time I carefully composed the shot and slowly squeezed the shutter release only to discover I had neglected to advance the film!:eek:
     
  7. Carolyn

    Carolyn Premium Member

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    Have you used the 90 indoors for them yet? The only reason I ask is because of the extra reach you have using a zoom. The 90mm, IMO, is a special lens (the kind with fairy dust). The 50-140 is a great lens but missing the fairy dust. If you feel the reach is needed, then you’d be good to go with the zoom. If it’s not needed, then I’d stay with the 90mm. I don’t think you’re going to lose any IQ. Both are superb. I did a professional group portrait using both lens outdoors on a windy day. Both sets of images where good and I really couldn’t tell the difference. Where you’ll see the magic in the 90mm is for close ups or shallow DOF. Both will be the same color and sharpness, the 90mm just has that special something.
     
  8. markjwyatt

    markjwyatt Premium Member

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    Mirrorless have their own challenges. I have been playing with adapted lenses (meaning I am taking the lenses on and off) and got my first sensor blob. I may be wrong (have had SLRs but not DSLRs), but I suspect that the mirror int he DSLR does shield the sensor from direct sensor blob deposition. On the other hand, if a blob does enter, every time the mirror flips, I suspect the blob could randomly (statistically speaking) recirculate and could end up on the sensor anyway. I think I would rather have dust in the viewfinder than on my sensor. That being said, I guess it is not clear to me if either design is better or worse for sensor blobs.
     
  9. Frank Weiser

    Frank Weiser Premium Member

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    Fairy dust is important to me so I will stay with the 90. I also thought about adding a second body for my 35mm1.4 so I wouldn’t have to change lenses. Thanks for the information.
     
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  10. Frank Weiser

    Frank Weiser Premium Member

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    I guess I equate a dirty viewfinder like a dirty car windshield with bug splats all over it that never quite seem to disappear whereas the sensor is easily accessible and easy to clean like your sunglasses.
     
  11. Carolyn

    Carolyn Premium Member

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    Having shot a Nikon for 9 years and now Fuji for 3+, Fuji wins hands down for less sensor dust and super ease of cleaning the sensor. My Nikons would take several swabs to clean. My Fuji’s only takes one. I can’t speak to Canon or Sony cameras as I haven’t owned either.
     
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  12. Frank Weiser

    Frank Weiser Premium Member

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    I've owned my Fuji X-T1 for two years now and have never had the need to clean the sensor yet. Maybe it's because I bought some cleaning swabs just in case :)
     
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