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Confessions of a Fuji cheater

Discussion in 'General X Camera Forum' started by Voxford, Mar 12, 2018.

  1. Spock66

    Spock66 Premium Member

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    I would strongly agree with this recommendation - Michael Freeman is the author.
     
  2. Angus

    Angus Premium Member

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    A lot of great advice from many expert photographers.
    I am just an amateur and was in your place about a year ago then turned a corner.
    I only shoot jpeg, because I don’t have time to put RAW files thru processing.
    Things changed for me when I got the XF 23 f1.4 and the 56.
    I also take a lot of photos of the same subjects and what I find is for every 100 shots probably around 90% are binned while the rest are in my collection. Not everyone’s way of doing it, I know, but it works for me.
     
  3. Tim Sewell

    Tim Sewell Premium Member

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    Not really - it means I stretch myself to make images that I find artistically satisfying with the tools that I have. I don't set out to get a specific image, I set out to translate what I see into an image or images that are pleasing to me.

    Obviously on the occasions I'm being paid I take a different approach, but the lessons I learn from my personal photography enable me to interpret whatever brief I am trying to fulfil in such a way as to produce better work.
     
  4. cbass

    cbass Premium Member

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    If you can post some images then perhaps we can provide better feedback. Perhaps a dumb question but are you editing these photos with software? Almost all the stunning photos you see on here have been digitally edited.
     
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  5. YogiMik

    YogiMik Premium Member

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    Of course I do edit all my images. This is the part of creation. To finish, what camera alone can not do. As it was in film days, so it is in digital era. A camera alone has always a very limited capacity to automatically process and image SOOC. Even, if you manage to set up settings individually (not practical approach) for every single shot, get satisfying SOOC results, still it's possible to get much better results in the post. Ansel Adams has spent much more time in the dark room, than in the field. Also, in digital process takes many years of intensive learning and perfecting editing skills, to get the best results. Personally, good enough results are not enough for me. Some pros process own images in automated way. I do approach to every image individually, b/c every one is unique.
     
  6. CWRailman

    CWRailman Premium Member

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    With the exception of faulty equipment, unsatisfying photos are seldom the fault of the camera equipment. Most often it can be traced back to the photographer’s skills, knowledge of basic photographic principals and artistic vision. If your photo’s are not up to your expectations you should probably stay away from camera stores and quite considering any new equipment until you learn to extract all you can out of what you already have. Spending an hour or two per day watching Youtube videos on the photographic subject of your choice, especially those produced or featuring any of the Fuji X shooters, will do more than throwing more money at camera equipment. Best would be to watch videos that present someone using the very equipment you have or something similar. With few exceptions, the camera equipment that many photographers carry and use is capable of producing photo’s that are way beyond their skill set. They are just not willing to admit it. Photography is a constant learning process and when you think you know it all, as some folks do and a few of them are on Youtube, is when you stop learning. Considering your upcoming trip you might want to watch a few of Please login or register to view linksas he is currently using a Fuji X-T1 which produces images similar to your X-E2.
     
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  7. JRick

    JRick Premium Member

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    since you still have some time to make a decision i want to second the one about just bringing the X100T and leaving all the other gear at home
    - you will cover more ground with less effort and see more opportunities
    - you will learn to explore the INFINITE numbers of different shots you can take with that one camera rather than dick around debating what lens to attach (in the field) to the one you haven't mastered yet, and then be limited by the one you did attach //lol//
    - you will see how to "work the shot" by making adjustments to settings and by moving your body to find different shooting perspectives
    - you can pack much lighter since all you need to bring is extra SD cards and hopefully a flash
    - i could list a dozen more reasons but not sure if you would want to read thru them :)
    - have fun on the trip too when you're not shooting !

    for what it's worth, i've shot FF Nikons for years in/out of a studio and consider myself a professional. I still LOVE that camera, but i have learned a TON more in the past few months since i started shooting with the X100F too. Both have their strong points and very few weak ones.
     
  8. rybolt

    rybolt rybolt Staff Member

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    In the past two years I've owned three A7 cameras and sold them each time. I loved the files but couldn't adapt to the body controls. This is odd for me as I rarely pay any attention to the ergonomics of a camera and get used to them very quickly.
    Long story cut short. I have an A7II kit arriving today. I really wanted a full frame camera to use with my adapted lenses. I have about 30 of them and the results on the Fuji are very good but the lack of wide angle led me to the Sony. I'll be on a five week Ireland visit in May and my plan is to take XT1 cameras, Fuji lenses and the Sony with the 14mm Roki and the 55mm f1.8 Zeiss. I'll also take a 20mm f3,5 UD Nikkor, 24mm f2 Nikkor, and 35mm f1.4 Nikkor for use with the Sony. The last decision is whether to take the 180mm f2.8 Nikkor for use with both the Fuji and Sony cameras.
     
  9. FMW

    FMW Premium Member

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    Your issue won't be fixed with equipment. Good photography is in the eye, the mind and the practice put into using them creatively. The camera is simply a device used to record what you saw and imagined. It isn't about the equipment at all.
     
  10. JRick

    JRick Premium Member

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    re : "Your issue won't be fixed with equipment. Good photography is in the eye, the mind and the practice put into using them creatively. The camera is simply a device used to record what you saw and imagined. It isn't about the equipment at all."

    - that is mostly a true statement but i would suggest the equipment is also VERY important. we live in an age where the equipment can do a LOT more than it did "back in the day". but in the same light, it makes us more Lazy since we assume if we fire euff shots, some will be good nuff to keep //lol//
    - many equate "practice" with the number of shots taken, rather than a step by step mastery of the camera controls; which is boring and time consuming

    - i visit a camera club on occasion and in the past 3-4 years i've probably talked with 75-100 shooters. Many had an Iphone or Pad full of their "nice" shots, but NONE had mastered their cameras. meaning if i asked a question about why they chose "this or that" setting, NONE could give me a reason why, and when i questioned them further, most of them could not predict what would happen to the image if they changed one setting. some had been shooting years
    1. the more features their camera had, the less they used :)
    2. the more advanced their camera was, the less they understood about it
    3. the older their camera was, the better they were at using it
    my takeaway was that today's camera are in some ways too good because they seem so easy. instant feedback is GREAT, but the kicker is that the laws of photography are still the same no matter how technically advanced the camera might be, the gear freaks would rather shoot than learn photography

    - not trying to be overly critical, just using this as an example of people who spend BIG money buying a VERY capable camera but never take the time to learn how to use the equipment they are holding in their hand. it had nothing to do with their eyes or mind......many were artists and/or very creative people

    guess i'm too old school. today people can rap about the tech specs of their camera or lens B0keh, DOF, IQ and DR, but have no idea how to get it or control it when they shoot :-(

    some trivia since i live in Japan....do you all know that Bokeh comes from the Japanese word "BowKay"......meaning old, feeble minded, or "fuzzy" in the head ??? :)
    ....it's not "bowkuh", like many people choose to pronounce it :)
     
  11. Angus

    Angus Premium Member

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    When I bought the X-T1 I also purchased a kindle version of the manual by Rico Pfirstinger.
    I am really impressed with the Fuji cameras ease of use, everything can be controlled with dials and no taking the eye away from the viewfinder to search thru electronic menus or going to automatic settings for sports or landscapes etc. In short the camera makes you think about what to do and enables you to do it quickly.
    Reminds me of the iconic Pentax ME Super.
    In this age of the internet with information so easy to get, it’s a great idea to read and find out all the photography terminology and how to make the camera give you the image you want.
    There was a thread on the forum about the camera type you have doesn’t matter, it’s you that matters (along with using a good lens)
     
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  12. rsn48

    rsn48 Active Member

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    It takes courage to move beyound technique to creativity. Also a sense of humour helps.
     
  13. SquarePeg

    SquarePeg Hear me roar

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    I found that looking at other people’s photos and figuring out what it was about them that attracted me, was the easiest way for me to develop an eye.

    Imitate
    Assimilate
    Innovate
     
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