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Elm leaf

Discussion in 'Wildlife-Nature' started by nimbushopper, Jan 11, 2017.

  1. nimbushopper

    nimbushopper Premium Member

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    Taken this morning with XE-1 and 35mm f1.4 at F2.5, 1/125sec.
    [​IMG]DSCF7793 by nimbushopper, on Flickr
     
  2. twest820

    twest820 119777C

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    Are you certain of the genus? Offhand I can't think of a palmately lobed Ulmus species with margins entire and am not seeing any on a quick search of keys within Ulmaceae.
     
  3. mugmedia

    mugmedia Premium Member

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    Nice image, but per twest820's comment, it does look like a type of maple.
     
  4. nimbushopper

    nimbushopper Premium Member

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    I stand corrected! It is a sycamore tree leaf. I was fooled because the trunk of the tree is very similar to an elm.
     
  5. twest820

    twest820 119777C

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    Kinda, yeah, though Acer is fairly distinct from Platanus and Australian species with sycamore as a common name. Ceratopetalum, Cryptocarya, Platanus, and such aren't genera I'm familiar with but my hunch is not Acer pseudoplatanus. Without more clues from @nimbushopper that's purely speculative, however.
     
  6. mugmedia

    mugmedia Premium Member

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    Sycamore sounds more like it now. It is quite uncommon here as we are on the extreme outer edge of its distribution. There is only one I can think of nearby, on our neighbor’s property a couple doors down. Every time I walk past it, I wonder what kind of “maple” it is, because the bark is so different than the common maples here, and I never see any other trees like it. I’ve been expecting that tree to die for years because the bark looks so flaky and patchy, as if diseased. But googling sycamore, I see that bark is characteristic. So... another mystery solved.
    :sword:
     
  7. twest820

    twest820 119777C

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    Platanus occidentalis, mayhap? Exfoliating bark is common among woody plants and usually just an indication they're growing (some species, for example Pinus ponderosa, have even arranged clever benefits from getting rid of bark). Some types of exfoliation are associated with pathogens, however.
     

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