This site is supported by the advertisements on it, please disable your AdBlocker so we can continue to provide you with the quality content you expect.

I am a snob

Discussion in 'Printing (Instax and others)' started by Brian1940, May 16, 2018.

  1. Brian1940

    Brian1940 Premium Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2017
    Messages:
    1,083
    Likes Received:
    2,072
    Location:
    Leeds, West Yorkshire

    -Return to Top-

    Back in the old days black and white was the " photographers : choice, colour was for happy snappers. B/W users spent hours in darkened rooms mixing wonderful concoctions of chemicals,. On the other hand colour users took their films to the chemist, or sent them away for processing. Colour users were satisfied with En Prints or used the dreaded positive film to produce scores of slides which they insisted dragging out on every occasion, visitors normally lasted ten minutes and then died of boredom. No, photographers worked in B/W, colour was for snappers .......well I did say I was a snob.

    Anyway times change, Adopting the Fuji system I accidentally started looking at colour, amazing, it's rather good. It can't be that difficult, I find terms such as seeing monochrome or colour totally meaningless, I see a subject and I reckon any subject worth photographing will work in either.

    Anyway, I have a question.

    I use a 27" 5000K Mac Retina display, is it any use buying a calibrator, at the moment I am finding getting colours to print properly a rather hit and miss. affair. I think my monitor has only a brightness control.....

    Please help.
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2018
  2. c0ldc0ne

    c0ldc0ne Premium Member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2011
    Messages:
    553
    Likes Received:
    153
    Location:
    The Netherlands

    -Return to Top-

    While the Mac's physical display controls are in fact limited to brightness, it does fully support the color profiles produced by calibrating systems. So calibration will give you the same benefits on your Mac as it would on other types of systems.

    Whether or not you feel it is worth the money/time/effort is of course something only you can decide.
     
  3. ebruder

    ebruder Premium Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2015
    Messages:
    626
    Likes Received:
    256
    Location:
    Cleveland, Ohio, USA

    -Return to Top-

    Just to address your calibration question: Yes, if your are unsatisfied with the color matching between screen and image. A calibration device such as Color Munki will be a very useful purchase. It will adjust your monitor by setting a custom LUT (color Look Up Table) for it. You should then contact your print lab to get the ICC that it uses, if you are not printing yourself. ICC's are often on a lab's web page. You'll then have set your monitor and printing to the same standards.

    If you use Lightroom, you can also produce a "soft proof" based on you labs printer and fine tune your image even more. I'd assume other programs besides LR offer soft proofing as well.

    Bet of success.

    EB
     
    redshifted likes this.
  4. Richard_R

    Richard_R Eclectic eccentric Staff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2011
    Messages:
    8,410
    Likes Received:
    9,254
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia

    -Return to Top-

    Then they invented PowerPoint.
     
    bralk likes this.
  5. redshifted

    redshifted photographer

    Joined:
    May 25, 2013
    Messages:
    1,745
    Likes Received:
    4,381
    Location:
    midwest or so cal us or...

    -Return to Top-

    Congratulations on evolving to accepting color vision and photography!
    Most b&w diehards never get there :cool:.

    Print color management is a big fat can of worms if you're picky about your results.
    Macs are pretty good out of the box for color balance on screen.
    Every printer and paper used can have an associated color profile or bias that can skew printed color output.
    It really involves dialing in your entire workflow vis-a-vis the way you want your prints to look on the paper you prefer.
    Paper manufacturers have product specific color profiles you'll want to apply to your printing attempts.
    Remember all that time spent in the b&w darkroom learning to make satisfactory prints and apply that approach to color management and printing.
    Soft-proofing in image editing software is a useful first step.
     
    JimFenner likes this.
  6. Beaumont

    Beaumont Premium Member

    Joined:
    May 29, 2015
    Messages:
    538
    Likes Received:
    230
    Location:
    ladysmith B.C.

    -Return to Top-

    When I started to make colour prints any resemblance between the screen and print was accidental. I acquired a Spyder3 calibrator and I started producing acceptable prints.The cost was soon covered in less "throw away" prints, not to mention the frustration reduction . The Spyder3 is well past it's "best by" date so I am going to replace it with a Spyder5.
     
  7. Stephen Scharf

    Stephen Scharf Premium Member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2012
    Messages:
    580
    Likes Received:
    875
    Location:
    East Bay, California

    -Return to Top-

    Bear in mind that you can use something like a Color Munki or Eye One Disply to profile your iMac's Retina display, but you cannot calibrate it (they are entirely different things); they can only be calibrated at the Apple factory. I've profiled mine, and Apple does a good job of calibrating them, and as a result, they are quite accurate, with delta-Es right around 2 or under (which is excellent). The key thing to match prints is to set the display luminance low enough to match paper brightness. Most people have their display set WAAAY too bright. You want to be working in the range of 100-120 cd/m^2.
     
    JimFenner likes this.
  8. pszilard

    pszilard RemektekMedia.com

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2011
    Messages:
    2,803
    Likes Received:
    945
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia

    -Return to Top-

    Suggestion:
    1. Take a flash photo of a white sheet of typing paper, using camera white balance set to auto - that should set the correct settings for flash
    2. Brin in the JPG into your favourite editor, such as Lightroom, or whatever
    3. Use the program's white balance with a pipette style point picker, auto white balance the shot. This will result in a white (or gray) of complete neutrality, as the computer "sees" it. Now visually inspect the colour on your screen. If it is satisfactory without a colour ting, then no adjustment to colour is necessary!
    4. You can search the web and download a screen colour test chart and see how that is displayed. This will also show a graduated grey scale (assuming you got a good chart) and then adjust your screen brightness so that you can see a step at either end of the brightness scale
    If you cannot achieve satisfactory result then go buy a Spyder 3 or Color Munki (Monkey?), which will create and adjusted colour profile.
     
  9. Shadowside

    Shadowside Good Glass is Forever...

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2013
    Messages:
    2,248
    Likes Received:
    1,965
    Location:
    Winnipeg, Canada

    -Return to Top-

    Calibrate Brian... Calibrating even helps with tones in monochrome PP.
     
  10. SausalitoDog

    SausalitoDog Premium Member

    Joined:
    May 1, 2011
    Messages:
    2,097
    Likes Received:
    897
    Location:
    Sausalito, CA USA

    -Return to Top-

    Back in the early days of digital printing, it was a thrill to be able to make color prints for us darkroom junkies...then we quickly fell into the quagmire of trying to make a good BW print. For many years this was the toughest print to make...now with great printers, inks and software, we can do everything better than before !!! how sweet it is !!!
     
    Beaumont and jknights like this.
  11. Goldingd

    Goldingd Premium Member

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2014
    Messages:
    1,004
    Likes Received:
    304
    Location:
    Anaheim CA

    -Return to Top-

    By the way, are you printing on your own printer or are you sending your image to a service?

    Printing at home you need the correct profile for printer, ink, and paper. And you need to know what settings are best for that printer. Never print using a computers operating system print management, that is doomed to failure.

    Sending to a service, you need to find out what they recommend on format, on resolution, bit depth, on color mode, color space, and see if they have a preview prof
     
  12. Pobert58

    Pobert58 Premium Member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2013
    Messages:
    247
    Likes Received:
    239
    Location:
    Texas USA

    -Return to Top-

    You can calibrate your monitor on a Mac. Go to System Preferences, then choose "Displays". The resulting window will have tabs for "Display", "Color" and "Night Shift". Choose "Color", and then choose the button for "Calibrate...". The features of the calibration process are listed in the attached graphic.

    I realize this is not the type of color profiling discussed above, but in a way it kind of is and might be a good thing to do.



    Screen Shot 2018-05-16 at 7.21.16 PM.png
     
  13. Fujiphotog

    Fujiphotog Amateur photographer.

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2015
    Messages:
    1,953
    Likes Received:
    2,016
    Location:
    Toronto, Canada

    -Return to Top-

    How do you know when you are in the brightness range of 100-120 cd/m^2 on an iMac or a MacBook Pro?
     
  14. Stephen Scharf

    Stephen Scharf Premium Member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2012
    Messages:
    580
    Likes Received:
    875
    Location:
    East Bay, California

    -Return to Top-

    Hi Pobert,
    Apple may refer to this as calibration, but, technically, its still profiling. The two terms are very often used interchangeably, but they are different. It's kind of like the difference between accuracy and precision, which people get mixed up all the time, though they too, are completely different measures. This list reflects part of the process steps for profiling. It's not an actual software-driven control of full hardware-based calibration, technically-speaking. The displays that can actually utilize hardware-based calibrated are the NEC PA-BK-SV series, the Eizo ColorEdge, and IIRc, the new BenQ series.

    But for all practical purposes, the Apple Retina displays are so well calibrated at the factory, that if you profile them, you will be able to get a profile and display that matches a calibrated display very well. I would say that the NECs, Eizos, etc., have a statistically significant more accurate display based on their hardware calibration, but a well-profiled Apple display will be so close that there is very little practical difference.

    You are absolutely correct it is a good thing to do. But users need to know what the values they should use to set luminance, gamma, and color temperature, etc.
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2018
    Pobert58 likes this.
  15. Stephen Scharf

    Stephen Scharf Premium Member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2012
    Messages:
    580
    Likes Received:
    875
    Location:
    East Bay, California

    -Return to Top-

    The software used for profiling or calibration (assuming it is a display that can be calibrated) will allow you to set the monitor luminance. It will be a lot dimmer than most folks are used to, which is why color and color-managed professionals work in a fairly dark room with walls painted in Munsell gray.
     
  16. ysarex

    ysarex Premium Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2014
    Messages:
    1,084
    Likes Received:
    740
    Location:
    St. Louis

    -Return to Top-

    Get a colorimeter and get your display calibrated. Then you can be a "calibration snob."

    [​IMG]
     
  17. Stephen Scharf

    Stephen Scharf Premium Member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2012
    Messages:
    580
    Likes Received:
    875
    Location:
    East Bay, California

    -Return to Top-

    Actually, if you want to be a proper calibration snob, you need to get not a colorimeter, but a spectrophotometer, e.g. the I1 Pro2. Then you can create profiles for your camera, display, printer and even, projector.
     
  18. Pobert58

    Pobert58 Premium Member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2013
    Messages:
    247
    Likes Received:
    239
    Location:
    Texas USA

    -Return to Top-

    Stephen, many thanks!
     
  19. ru2far2c

    ru2far2c Premium Member

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2014
    Messages:
    299
    Likes Received:
    189
    Location:
    Cuenca, Ecuador

    -Return to Top-

    Another one for calibration especially if your printing at home. Most apple screen are too bright anyway. Get the paper profile from the paper manufacture for your specific printer will help in getting the color correct and constant. If your sending out to a local lab get the profile for their printers as well it will help.
    X-Rite makes several different spectrophotometers and colormeter to serve your purpose.
     
  20. ru2far2c

    ru2far2c Premium Member

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2014
    Messages:
    299
    Likes Received:
    189
    Location:
    Cuenca, Ecuador

    -Return to Top-

    You can set it up in the Calibration software that come with your puck. I personal set mine to 80 cd/m^2, white point of D6500 and Gamma 2.20 using SpectraView II software. In the early days with Gamma was set to 1.8. My puck is make by x-rite for NEC. Use an earlier Colormunki Photo to make profiles for my printer papers. It also depends on snobbish one wants to get for color management. ;)
     

Share This Page

  1. fujix-forum.com uses cookies to help personalize content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice