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Muscle memory when switching between different cameras

Discussion in 'General X Camera Forum' started by Luis Costa, Sep 12, 2017.

  1. Luis Costa

    Luis Costa Well-Known Member

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    This is a questions for users of both X-T-type bodies and X-E/Pro types.

    I have a X-T20 and recently got a X-E2 as a secondary camera body so I don't have to switch lenses all the time. In the X-T20 I pretty much had the buttons location memorized and I could get to them without taking my eye off the EVF, but in the X-E2 I'm still quite lost and always need to pause and look for the buttons.
    My question is: is it possible to develop "muscle memory" for 2 different cameras? do you guys still find yourselves thinking about the location of the buttons, or were you able to memorize the location for the different camera bodies?
     
  2. leoda1945

    leoda1945 Premium Member

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    I have XPro1, XA1 & XE1 and my fingers are always tripping over where the #### buttons are.
     
  3. kenbennett

    kenbennett Premium Member

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    Yes, I do think it's possible. I switch between the X Pro 2 and the X-T2 all the time, and then add in the Canon 5Ds once in awhile, and don't have issues with finding the buttons. (And with the Canon I'm using the thumb button focus, so that's even more of a switch.) I think you'll just need to spend more time with them, perhaps. :)
     
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  4. EAB

    EAB Active Member

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    I think a lot depends on on how much pressure you're under. Life is simply better if you have like bodies. IOW the less thought you have to put into the mechanics of the shot the more you can concntrate on the shot (content) itself.

    Having said that sure you can do it, but you're robbing processor cycles (organic ones of course).
     
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  5. Bandje

    Bandje Premium Member

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    I think it is mostly dependent on the time you spend with both cameras, and what bodies they are. I use a XT-2 and have a XT-1 backup. These bodies are mostly similar, but in some ways very different. I mainly use the T2, but some times (like now, when the T2 is sent in for repair) is have to switch to the T1. I guess if you use both bodies a lot at the same time, the problem would be much less. Mind you, it took just about 10 minutes to get the T1-muscles warmed up and ready to use ;-).

    I must admit however, that the difference between the T-bodies and the XE-bodies is much greater..
     
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  6. BillC-PA

    BillC-PA Premium Member

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    It’s like many things in life – use different things enough and it is easy to switch back and forth – many people are fluent in multiple languages and can switch back and forth. Likewise, several musician friends of mine play several differently tuned string instruments, and they can switch back and forth effortlessly, but they practice and use each instrument. I use X-T2 and X-T1 and haven’t had much of an issue, although I use the X-T2 more I do have to sometimes consciously switch gears when using the X-T1. So yes, I believe muscle memory can be learned for whatever systems are being used, but it takes time and practice as well as being sure to go back and use the less used system every once in a while.
     
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  7. streetsntravel

    streetsntravel Premium Member

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    Practice, practice, practice..... It may be possible to easily switch.

    I use a X-Pro2, a Nikon Df a Ricoh GR and Nikon N1. There are some very philosophical differences and gotchas when switching between those cameras. I've used each quit a lot and the XP2 is now my most frequent. My fingers can pretty much fly around the back of that camera. The Df was my long-term before the XP2. If I spend a few minutes with that before using, most of that operational fluence returns. The GR requires a bit more work, but when I "rethink" it, it's a great camera to use.

    For me the danger is that each time I return to the Df, I want to fall in love with that camera and in part it's strobe system all over again. Even at 16Mp the sensor is gorgeous and well behaved. Anything I attempt, the camera can accomplish. However, the X system is my system and I've committed to it in a significant way financially. If the XP2 were organic and trying to participate in our emerging relationship, I'm afraid the XP2's suspicion, and my lingering memory, of the Df would make short work of US from the X perspective. What I hope the XP2 really knows, is that my hands are just not capable of holding the Df for 24/7 any more. There is just too much pain and I must move on.

    Practice, practice, practice...... good in any lasting relationship.
     
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  8. beakhammer

    beakhammer Premium Member

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    Yes it is. I started with an X-Pro1 and then added an X-E2. After a while I learned to tell them apart by feel and can usually even navigate the differing menus without having to think about it, as well as find the right buttons. I do use both cameras (and more than thirty other film and digital cameras) on a fairly regular basis. The more cameras I use, the faster I can learn new ones. I have heard that linguists, once they know several languages, can pick up new languages quickly. It's like that.
     
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  9. Luis Costa

    Luis Costa Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the reassurance, I'll just keep using them and hopefully it won't be too long until they both feel familiar.
     
  10. Xenon100F

    Xenon100F Member

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    As others have said, it's not too difficult with 2 bodies. It just requires some practice and a brief warm-up period. It does start to get progressively more challenging when shooting with more than 2 cameras or multiple cameras from different manufacturers.
     
  11. boulevardier

    boulevardier Premium Member

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    It depends what kind of photography you do. If it's mainly static objects, still life, landscape, it just requires a moment's rethink. If you're shooting people, candids, street photography, it helps to be totally instinctive with your camera. I generally set my cameras in full manual, and mostly the same shutter speed and aperture combination, and move things from there. It's counterintuitive, but I find manual exposure quicker than re-thinking modes and dials between a DSLR and two different Fujis.
     

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