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50-140mm Pleased with OIS of 50-140mm at f/20

Discussion in 'Lens-Specific Photo Archive' started by morhafren, Jan 11, 2017.

  1. morhafren

    morhafren Premium Member

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    Wanted to catch the sun touching the mountains of the Norwegian mainland as seen from 23 miles away on Lofoten. Hand-held with 50-140mm at 140mm on a finger-freezing morning. I wasn't sure the OIS would cope when exposing for the small bright area alone but happy with the result.

    50-140mm @140mm f/20 1/10 sec ISO-800 -0.3 step
    DSCF8442Henningsvaer dawn_edited-1.jpg
     
  2. Breq

    Breq Member

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    Quite impressive OIS (or super stable hands) at 1/10s :)

    Why did you use f/20? Was it a mistake, an experiment or something else?
     
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  3. morhafren

    morhafren Premium Member

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    Good question. It was the presence of the headland in the foreground (slightly cropped) and the middle distance belt of land across the middle of the frame, both of which I wanted to get as sharp as possible, as well as the highlights on the distant mountains. So, yes, it was a bit of an experiment re DoF which also happened to show that the OIS is fine in low light. I needed the magnification so had to hope for the best!
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2017
  4. PatrickP

    PatrickP Premium Member

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    At f/20, basically nothing is really sharp due to diffraction. I would never advice to go higher than f/16, but f/11 as a maximum would be even better if you want sharpness.
     
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  5. morhafren

    morhafren Premium Member

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    Yes, my subsequent experience has borne this out. For greater DoF I tend never to go above f/16 these days, usually f/11 which works fine generally. I saw this image as three simple "planes", near/middle/distant each of which I wanted as sharp as possible, so I tried f/20 on the assumption I'd get greater depth of field. It worked to a certain extent but the real bonus was the OIS functioning in poor light. If I were to do it again I'd use either of the two larger apertures.
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2017
  6. wackou

    wackou Member

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    Was the front blurry at lower aperture?
    OIS is awsome with this lens!

    There's a website where you can compare MTF charts of the Fuji lenses and I think the F11 is the highest you should go with Fuji lenses. Many Fuji lenses work best at F5.6-8 max.
    Btw, if anyone know which website it is, please add a link :) cannot find it anymore.
     
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  7. David Anderson

    David Anderson Premium Member

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    Have to agree.
    In my experience, f8 is (generally) best for corner to corner sharpness and they only lens that I have and would go over f8 with is the 60 macro and even then, not by much.
    Obviously, there is probably a time & place for stopping down more, but for highest possible image quality it helps to know the limitations
    of individual lenses.

    Without really knowing where you are there, I would guess, that if you can eliminate enough immediate foreground, it should be possible to get everything in focus at f11 - or even less - with good critical manual focusing.
    Again, I'm guessing to a point.
     
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  8. morhafren

    morhafren Premium Member

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    Last edited: Jan 12, 2017
  9. morhafren

    morhafren Premium Member

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    @wackou: Interesting point about aperture and sharpness. I've been back through the other files I took at the same time (March 2016) and found a similar one from much the same position. This was taken at f/2.8 and 1/140 sec at 140mm. The wooden structure gives a context and I probably prefer this as a complete image. Considering this was taken at 1/140 sec and the other at 1/10 sec, there's not that much difference in the sharpness, even in the foreground rocks. Just wish I'd taken the same image at f/5.6 and f/8..!:)

    XT-1 50-140mm @ 140mm f/2.8 ISO-200 -0.3 step
    Henningsvaer dawn with wooden struucture_edited-2.jpg
     
  10. kiwitracks

    kiwitracks Well-Known Member

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    Maybe look at your hyperfocal distance and then compose your frame based on that? At F11 and 140mm, your hyperfocal distance is about 87m, which means that everything between 44m distance and infinity is in focus... Looking at your photos, that would probably have fit the bill.
    At F8, the hyperfocal distance moves to 122m, giving you a focussed area of 61m to infinity.
     
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  11. morhafren

    morhafren Premium Member

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    That's useful advice - thanks. I seem to remember a time when you could read the approximate hyperfocal distance straight off the distance and aperture scales on the lens barrel, which were adjacent to each other. The in-focus distance was read off between the aperture settings being used. Back in the 60s or possibly the 70s as well before autofocus came in- anyone remember using that arrangement?

    Probably went out with the slide rule, to which it had a certain similarity.
     
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  12. David Anderson

    David Anderson Premium Member

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    Showing my age, but yes.

    I like manual focus on my new Fuji's more than the DSLR's I had before thanks to the digital version of the old film scales in the viewfinder. Still messing around with the 2 options, but so far, it seems a fast and accurate way to manually focus for landscape shots.
     
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