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Samples of my "2 Step" Velvia preset for Lightroom

Discussion in 'X-T2, X-T1, X-T20, X-T10' started by Jomon Mondia, Sep 13, 2017.

  1. Jomon Mondia

    Jomon Mondia Active Member

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    I'm testing a new preset I created based on Velvia. I primarily shoot weddings and I'm surprised at the skin tones produced by Velvia. I kinda like it. Here are a couple of samples

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    It's "2 steps" because I produce a base image first using a raw file with Velvia film sim. I then make minor adjusments (temp, exposure) then export it as TIF. Then I apply the 2nd preset to the TIF file (Adobe, please give us LR layers damn it).
     
  2. Fujiphotog

    Fujiphotog Amateur photographer.

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    The end result looks good. Did you reduce Vevia's saturation in either step?
     
  3. Jomon Mondia

    Jomon Mondia Active Member

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    I did not reduce the overall saturation but on the HSL, I reduced the green saturation. I also moved the orange hue a bit to the yellow side.
     
  4. Tim Sewell

    Tim Sewell Well-Known Member

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    They're nice, but I can see some fairly bad posterisation around the clipped highlights and some yellowing highlights on skin, especially those areas that are veering towards overexposure Also - and I don't know, it may be an accurate representation of reality - the greens seem a little blue and artificial, which to my mind is very un-Velvia.
     
  5. YogiMik

    YogiMik Premium Member

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    Never use presets. Bad editing habit. Every image is different from the other. A preset hides a true potential hidden in the image.
     
    fugu 82-2 likes this.
  6. C_Smith

    C_Smith Active Member

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    Velvia and portraits rang in my ears like Roxanne Barr singing the national anthem of the United States!

    Glad you dialed back some of the color channels because Velvia film makes a red hot mess of skin tones. The absolute worst film for portraits. That said, I think the final results look nice. Didn't give the same kind of workover as Tim, but I agree - the final result is not Velvia like. Maybe closer to Provia or Astia...
     
  7. Tim Sewell

    Tim Sewell Well-Known Member

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    Obviously every image is different, but presets do have a place, depending on what you're actually doing. When I was photographing weddings, for instance, I had a base preset that got 90% of my images 90% of the way to where they were supposed to be. Similarly I have a few of my own presets for different image types - one called 'Red and green pop' for instance, that works well for me with woodland scenes etc. Again, I use them as a base and they take care of certain basic operations I know I will always use for a particular type of scene.

    Then there is the huge range of film simulation presets. If I decide that a particular image might have looked good on HP5 pushed to 800 I really don't have the time or resources to dial in the exact tonal responses of that film to the colours present in the image, so I use a preset from a reputable supplier and then tweak contrast, exposure and so on myself. At the end of the day, in the days before digital the type of film you shot on was a preset in itself.

    I don't think any of those use cases are bad editing habits, but of course, your mileage may vary.

    * Edited to correct poor grammar.
     

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