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The camera seems to always default to fastest aperture.

Discussion in 'X-E1, X-E2, and X-E2S' started by AARIK, Jun 18, 2017.

  1. AARIK

    AARIK Member

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    I've noticed that when shooting with Aperture set to auto, the camera seems to always default to the fastest aperture (i.e on a 16mm f1.4 will always pick 1.4) no matter what the focus setting. This is fine most of the time, but sometimes I want more dept of field, everything in focus. I know I can change the aperture and/or zone focus, but how to I tell the camera I don't want a shallow DOF when aperture is in Auto, whiteout having to manually set the aperture?
    In contrast, the iPhone always seems to try to get as much as possible in focus.
     
  2. Dirk Offringa

    Dirk Offringa Premium Member

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    If you want to choose your DOF you need to set you aperture accordingly. Why does that bother you?
     
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  3. Kimball Kinnison

    Kimball Kinnison Active Member

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    If light is low the camera will max out the aperture first, then the iso. If you want a particular aperture set it, either in aperture priority (that's what aperture priority is for) or manual.

    Another option is to use program shift. Let the auto pick its aperture, then overide it by using program shift. It picks a different shutter speed/aperture combination but still in full auto. It's usually a spin of a wheel. You can't do it if autoDR is set.

    The iPhone (and any other small sensor camera) has a very large depth of field due, in part, to the small sensor. Small sensor cameras hardly need to focus at all, pretty much everything is in focus when using them.
     
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2017
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  4. Richard_R

    Richard_R Eclectic eccentric

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    If you have the aperture on auto are you shooting shutter speed priority or do you have that on auto as well?
    To slow the aperture down in shutter speed priority simply choose a slower shutter speed and the camera will match it with the appropriate aperture.
     
  5. jknights

    jknights Moderator Staff Member

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    Which also is a complete PITA for a photographer who likes to control DOF.

    Cant please everyone.

    You either use Manual exposure or Aperture priority so you can set aperture to your preference. You can use AutoISO and this may provide more what you need.
     
  6. Blazer

    Blazer Fuji Commander

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    It will not ALWAYS select the widest aperture. If you use a slower shutter speed and/or fast iso, the apertures will get smaller. Or as stated above, try setting the shutter speed to auto and then control the aperture manually. Or just shoot in manual exposure mode.
     
  7. Goldingd

    Goldingd Premium Member

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    One thought to note, are you consistently Underexposing?
     
  8. Narsuitus

    Narsuitus Premium Member

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    Since most of my automatic exposure Nikon cameras and lenses are aperture priority; and since my adapted lenses on my mirrorless cameras are aperture priority; I have gotten in the habit of manually setting my aperture and letting the camera select the shutter speed.

    However, there are a few times when I need to set the shutter speed and allow the camera to select the aperture. For example, when I shooting fill-flash with non-dedicated flash, I do not want the camera to select a shutter speed that is higher than my maximum flash sync. Therefore, I manually set the shutter speed to 1/60th second and allow the camera to select the f/stop. [Note: I standardized on 1/60 because that is the maximum flash sync for some of my older cameras.]

    Another example is when I am shooting hand held under dim light with no flash. I do not want my camera to select a shutter speed that is likely to introduce unwanted camera movement or subject movement. Therefore, I manually set my shutter speed to 1/60 or 1/125 and allow the camera to select the f/stop and/or ISO.

    When depth-of-field is important to me, I usually use aperture priority or manual. I cannot think of a situation when I would want to use shutter priority.
     
  9. FMW

    FMW Member

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    I either use manual or program mode. The nice thing about program mode is that you can use the wheel to select the combination of aperture and shutter speed that suits your desired result while keeping the same meter-recommended exposure. If you want to vary from the exposure recommended by the camera, manual does the job. There really is no need for aperture or shutter priority. They only do half the job program mode does. Either keep both camera and lens set to A or neither set to A.
     
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  10. AARIK

    AARIK Member

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    This program mode or program shift is really cool. Thanks for pointing it out.
     
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  11. AARIK

    AARIK Member

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    IMG_0513.JPG Basically my challenge is controlling DOF, in low light and doing it all quickly. In this example, both "beasts" appear to be still, but that's just for a split second, during which I need to snap to that photo.
    You can see here that th puppy's nose is not in focus.
     
  12. Dirk Offringa

    Dirk Offringa Premium Member

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    Neither of the subjects are in focus actually, focus seems to be on the background. If you had set your focus point on the feline, you would have had a better result. And unless you use a good wide angle lens like the 16mm stopped down you wouldn't have had any chance get everthing "in focus" (meaning, in fact, "acceptably blurry": look up ""circle of confusion") from the dog's nose to the background.

    This is not a camera issue, but an operator issue . Either you want full auto and deal with it, or you want to be in control of certain settings because you know what the image you want to produce should look like.

    I would have anticipated both my composition and my settings before starting to disturb the "beasts" by approaching them so dangerously close ;-)

    -I would have set the focus point beforehand
    -I would have choses fixed aperture, fixed SS, and auto-ISO
    -I would have checked if the camera exposes correctly "off-subject"

    if OK, only then I would have attempted the shot. This looks like a lot of things to do as opposed by full program mode, but with a little practice it's only a matter of seconds, or less. But then again, I'm not a wildlife photographer, I can understand that in some situations, even a second migh be crucially important: safety first!
     
  13. JimFenner

    JimFenner Member

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    I fancy camera makers should provide a menu option to allow focus racking at the maximum automated rate, whether using electronic shutter or no.
    Then you could put it all together in Photoshop

    Maybe manual off-camera flash would help here, or a continuous LCD array

    I agree the Program Mode tip is golden, back to the manual (nah, Google!) for me
     
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  14. AARIK

    AARIK Member

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    The lens is actually a 16 f1.4. Definitely operator issue here.
    I'm not as advanced as you are as to set everything myself but I do understand the DOF and circle of confusion, read about them. What I lack is experience with what camera settings will render very thing in focus. My main problem I think is figuring out what aperture to choose for that.
     
  15. Kimball Kinnison

    Kimball Kinnison Active Member

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    Have you tried a DOF calculator? You can get them as apps for a smartphone, or as a webpage

    Online Depth of Field Calculator

    Enter your lens detail, your aperture and focused distance and it gives the depth of field at those settings.
     
  16. GregWard

    GregWard Premium Member

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    Actually your issues here might start with the exposure/lighting conditions? Don't beat yourself up to much here because you've got a tricky situation to photograph. The Dog is in quite a bit of shadow (and has a dark face anyway). So I would TRY to start with focus on him. But you might struggle to find a suitable point to acquire focus. I'd use a fixed/single point but then be prepared to try different exact locations on the Dogs face to see where the camera is happy locking on. Ideally this would be an eye - but you might not get a choice. Worst case you might need to choose something at a similar distance.

    Then I'd experiment with different apertures (and maybe slightly varying your distance from the Dog) to see what effect you like best. A slightly blurred Cat and very blurred background could work nicely for example. However, in your image the camera (as Dirk says) has locked onto the background (were you using an area focus mode?) So you will be struggling to control DOF before you even start.
     
  17. FMW

    FMW Member

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    Hopefully you understand that the animals - particularly the dog - are seriously underexposed and out of focus. You should have metered the dog, focusing on the eyes and let the rest of the subject fall wherever it wanted to fall. After all this is a shot of two animals, not an architectural image of the room. The average metering was affected a lot by the window light, causing the overall underexposure. Had you done the focus and metering properly, you wouldn't have had to worry about DOF because the background would have been overexposed and soft, drawing the eye to the dog. So DOF wasn't the issue. Focus point and exposure were the issue.
     
  18. AARIK

    AARIK Member

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    Yeas, i realize it's operator error, but i was originally asking if there is a way to tell the camera i want everything in focus (where i don't have to set everything manually). I am not that experienced so setting everything myself takes time and trial and error, but sometimes i just don't have the time for that. I think i will try playing around with the program shift functions.
    Also, yes, the camera locked focus on the back wall in this pic. I really just used the pic as an example.

    Still learning, and thanks all for the comments.
     
  19. AARIK

    AARIK Member

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    I have Photo Pills, what i lack it time sometimes to plan and setup :)
     
  20. GregWard

    GregWard Premium Member

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    Use Aperture priority, set the aperture to (maybe?) f11, and set Auto ISO. Then play with the aperture ring if you need more DOF or the shutter speed is too low/ISO to high.
     
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