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Tips for Shooting JPEGs

Discussion in 'X-T2, X-T1, X-T20, X-T10' started by cali92rs, Oct 11, 2017.

  1. cali92rs

    cali92rs Premium Member

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    Just a heads up, this is not a RAW vs JPEG debate thread ;)

    Anyway, I have shoot exclusively RAW ever since I have shot digital. But I am on a computer all day at work, and it is not appetizing at all coming home and sitting at a computer to process my photos.
    I was wondering if you guys have any tips as far as how to get good JPEGs, i.e. what do you do for white balance, lifting shadows, and sharpening? Do you have a preset for every situation?
     
  2. dixeyk

    dixeyk Dabbler

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    I use the custom settings and tweak the sharpness, contrast etc. for them. I typically have 4 that I use regularly. (BW+Red, BW+Green, Astia and Velvia) and set the fn button on my X-P1 to bring up the custom settings. I don't have the camera in front of me at the moment but happy to post them when I get home. I have been able to get really nice results with color but finding BW a little tougher to tease out what I want. They look pretty good but I'm still working on them.

    Now, on my X10 I have 2 custom BW settings that work great. I wish my X-P1 did BW half as well as my X10 does it.
     
  3. Fujiphotog

    Fujiphotog Amateur photographer.

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    The answer to your questions depends on what you shoot, and how you light it. Can you tell us that?
     
  4. cali92rs

    cali92rs Premium Member

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    These days, my 3 year old son is my favorite subject. But i shoot anything...macro, vacation shots, museums, cars etc. All except macro in available light. And i think that is where i run to issues, i have to play with shadows a lot.
     
  5. Fujiphotog

    Fujiphotog Amateur photographer.

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    In that case, use the Q menu to experiment with the things that affect jpegs, such as the film simulation, highlight and shadow and colour. For your son, try ASTIA, and -1 or -2 in shadows and -1 in highlights.
     
  6. dixeyk

    dixeyk Dabbler

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    A couple of my settings:

    Color (Sunny Outdoors)
    ISO Auto (limit 400)
    Dynamic Range: Auto
    Film Simulation: Velvia
    White Balance: Auto
    Sharpness: +1
    Highlight Tone: -1
    Shadow Tone: 0
    Noise Reduction: -2

    Most of the color in Please login or register to view links was shot with the set above

    Color (people)
    ISO Auto (limit 3200)
    Dynamic Range: Auto
    Film Simulation: Astia
    White Balance: Auto
    Sharpness: +1
    Highlight Tone: -1
    Shadow Tone: +1
    Noise Reduction: -2
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2017
  7. jhiascer

    jhiascer New Member

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    Thanks
     
  8. NewmanX

    NewmanX Premium Member

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    I tried these Out when I got my x-e2.
    Please login or register to view links
     
  9. GregWard

    GregWard Premium Member

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    Without wishing (at all) to turn this into a raw vs jpeg debate I think it is worth saying that almost everybody will benefit from SHOOTING both. After all the only real "expense" is that you need more card storage - and that's pretty cheap these days. I completely get that you don't want to muck around processing the images you have already shot. Some people do - some don't - and it's a very good reason for using JPEG images wherever possible if you don't.

    But that's an important caveat. If you're not 100% sure of your settings then you'll get greater flexibility/quality by modifying the RAW file if you have to do so. So shooting both - with a primary intent of always using the JPEG - but having the RAW as an occasional backup - seems to make the best sense to me. After all you can easily delete the RAW files once you are sure you have the image you wanted from JPEG.

    I suspect most people are aware these days - but, if not, then you should still shoot RAW + JPEG even if you only want the RAW file. The JPEG allows much greater magnification if you are reviewing the images on the back of the camera.
     
  10. fzdp

    fzdp Premium Member

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    shoot RAW + jpg, if you will not shoot raw you will miss it when you will find out that your meter missed the exposure. It is quite often that I have to redevelop JPG with correction of 1/3, 2/3 EV.
    For indoors I shoot with auto WB, outside with WB set manually to 5000K or sun. For taking pictures of people I use Astia or ProNeg Hi with Color +1. Noise reduction and sharpness set to -1
     
  11. cali92rs

    cali92rs Premium Member

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    Thanks for the tips guys.
    I will definitely start shooting RAW + JPEGs.
    How do you guys feel about DR100% vs 200 vs 400? I have never taken it off 100% because I haven't shot JPEGs.
     
  12. Lead

    Lead Member

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    Try the different options, works particularly well with a bright but cloudy sky as a test. You will see that 100 will produce overexposed parts in the sky and 400 won't.

    I'm being very general here as it depends on your initial exposure, but it should show you the principles.

    Worth looking at the DPR site reviews of the original Fuji cameras, X100, X100s, XPro1, where they give good examples of the various outputs at different DR values.
     
  13. barry S

    barry S Active Member

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    Have a look at Gordon Laing's from Cameralabs book "In Camera " Please login or register to view links his camera reviews are always solid......he is a great fuji fan and a very good photographer...and in this book he concentates on the idea of never having to use post processing. Its a best seller.....and shows some fine work.

    "In Camera is a photography book by Cameralabs Editor, Gordon Laing. It celebrates the art of JPEG photography with 100 of his travel images, all presented out-of-camera. No filter, no Photoshop, just pure photography! Each photo is accompanied by behind the scenes details, techniques and settings. Everything you need to shoot confidently in-camera! "

    The quality of Fuji Jpegs these days is astounding....and it you get it right first time....why bother with raw ?
     
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  14. GregWard

    GregWard Premium Member

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    +1 on the Gordon Laing book - it's good and goes some way (at least) to dispelling some of the bigotry around RAW images that some people seem to have. Actually I have a pet theory that it's now often Pros that are totally happy shooting JPEG. After all if you really know your kit well, and tend to shoot the same sort of subjects often, then it becomes much easier to get it right in camera. Then JPEG images are so good these days, and time is money for a Pro, so why would they waste it?

    That said - I myself pretty much exclusively use RAW. I just don't look down on those who don't! Unlike OP I actually enjoy the post-processing aspects and prefer to know that I have the best option to squeeze the best out of each image. Isn't it great we have choices?
     
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  15. AnthonyM

    AnthonyM Premium Member

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    I agree, I have the luxury of not having to sell my photos for a living, so can take the time to maximise quality to my own satisfaction.
     
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  16. F2Bthere

    F2Bthere Premium Member

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    You don't think you mention which camera, which somewhat limits our advice.... so take that which applies to your model and ignore the rest.

    In general, take a bunch of images in the type of light you typically favor and experiment. If you push each setting to the extreme ends, you will get a sense for what they do. See what you like and then dial it back to the level which pleases you. Some want saturation way up. Others like more subdued colors. You have to pick which you like.

    There is about to be firmware and software released for some models which allows in-camera processing controlled and viewed on your computer. This would make it easy to run some tests in batches, I would think.

    Unless noise is a problem, I would dial the noise correction all the way down. I like the red filter option with monochrome, especially Acros. If you want that high ASA film look, use ISO 1600 or more and dial up the grain.
     
  17. barry S

    barry S Active Member

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    "Shooting jpegs will improve your life"..................I liked this you tube video and told the guy so. I happen to agree with him.
    I shoot like him having got rid of several Nikon cameras and lenses and a mass of studio gear.

    ( does contain a few swear words for those easily offended)

     
  18. BreylPhoto

    BreylPhoto Premium Member

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    I remember Jay Maisel saying in some Scott Kelby video, that he shoots RAW+JPEG, because everybody tells him he has to. But he never uses the RAWs and works with the JPEGs only (for his street photography).
    Recently I saw another great comment in another video. The video was by a guy who has 100.000 followers on Instagram and so forth and admitted to shooting JPEG only with his XT-2 (Classic Crome) and post-processes these on his iPhone. Again, big uproar in the comments like "you will regret that", "one day you'll need the RAWs", blabla and the guy calmly replies "I don't print and I just shoot for my hobby. No need for RAW.".

    I tend to agree. Post-processing will not make a mediocre picture a good one. Cutting down on all that post-processing work gives you more time to take good pictures in the first place.

    But at the end: do what you enjoy most !

    Cheers,

    Robin
     
  19. GregWard

    GregWard Premium Member

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    RAW gives you more "head room" to correct any mistakes. So the advice to shoot RAW "just in case" is normally good advice. However, if somebody is only shooting for Instagram quality then it's unlikely to matter.

    I think your post-processing point is valid for somebody who "likes shooting" but, even if maybe you don't (?), some of us actually enjoy the post-processing. That's perhaps more "image making". Either way post-processing certainly won't make a mediocre photo great - but it could (on occasion) save an image. Also "image making" can be about more than just what happens when you click the shutter release.
     
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  20. BreylPhoto

    BreylPhoto Premium Member

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    My bad, I didn't intended to say shooting RAW is bad, or post processing is bad. Absolutely not.

    I just see it on a case by case basis. Not dogmatic.

    I have a three foot print of a Chicago morning skyline at my wall. Taken at 4:30 in the morning at about -5 degrees F.
    That shot meant a lot to me and I literally loved spending hours tweaking colors, contrast, toning, sharpness to my liking (on the RAW file).
    Some goes for all kinds of studio portraits for me, where I want to have full control of color, sharpness, noise reduction, etc.
    All good and well and that's just me. Everyone else's milage may vary.

    But for me, personally, for all the more mundane stuff, I'm happy to hand over those steps to the JPG engine. Particularly if it is as good as the Fuji JPG engine.

    Cheers,

    Robin
     
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