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What films are you shooting? Please post examples.

Discussion in 'Other Cameras' started by beakhammer, Nov 25, 2015.

  1. Activatedfx

    Activatedfx Premium Member

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    Which is why I've now moved on to the GW690. Holy cow. Huge 6x9 film frames. The 90mm f/3.5 gives an 35mm equivalent of 40mm/1.5, and from what I'm seeing on Flickr, the images are sharp with incredibly smooth OOF rendering. These beasts are fairly "affordable" as well. I need to turn off the internet for a few days. lol
     
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  2. beakhammer

    beakhammer Premium Member

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    I have handled the big Texas Leicas in a shop. They felt great to handle, and the viewfinders are amazing. They are Huge in a clown-shoe kind of way, but the results are well worth it, compared to my little folding 6x9 cameras, if you want really sharp contrasty negatives. I use a 6x9 back on my Crown Graphic and other 4x5 cameras and get tremendous results when combining this really big film with a good lens. The Fuji would be a whole lot more convenient, though not useful for close-up work.
     
  3. beakhammer

    beakhammer Premium Member

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    Taking everything into account I like 6x6 format best of the medium format options. 6x7 is great too. The film is plenty big, and the square format seems to open up my shooting in a really good way. I like the tall chunky aspect ratios better than 3/2. There are small and relatively portable options (the 6x6 folders are tiny) available in every camera type.

    The Mamiya 6 and 7 are arguably the best compact general-purpose film cameras ever made, but they are costly, and subject to the limitations of any rangefinder. I should be able to come close to the same quality, reasonable convenience, and more versatility with my 3-D printed Mercury, 6x7 back, and the right lens.
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2017
  4. Activatedfx

    Activatedfx Premium Member

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    After reading a few reviews and getting realistic with myself, I'm not quite as interested in the 690. It "sounds" great on paper, but it's honestly too big (not gonna haul that around NYC), no built-in meter, and I'll go broke getting the 8 frames per 120 rolls developed! ha
     
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  5. beakhammer

    beakhammer Premium Member

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    I think the 690 a great camera for specific uses, but it doesn't do enough different things to justify the expense for me. I had a borrowed 645 Rangefinder for a while (Bronica RF645) and that was a more reasonable size, had a good meter and was fun to shoot. I think the Fuji 645 RF cameras would be a great choice, but you really want a Mamiya 6 or 7.
     
  6. Activatedfx

    Activatedfx Premium Member

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    Yep. As I mentioned earlier in this thread, I had a Mamiya 7ii kit that was my dad's. I sold it many years ago, but regret it now. That said, the M6/7's are still too expensive and the lenses aren't as fast as I'd like.

    Funny story - There was a minor issue with the Mamiya 7ii (I think it was just a missing a little service hole cap, or something), and I wanted to get it fixed/replaced before selling. I lived a 1/2 hr from the Mamiya USA offices in Elmsford, NY (not sure if it's still there), so I drove down. They gave me a HECK of a hard time because there were a lot of "grey market" camera's coming in to the US at that time, and my dad hadn't registered the camera, so they wouldn't service it unless I could prove it was bought legitimately! So I had to dig through my dad's papers to find the original sales receipt before they would service the camera. (Luckily he kept all the receipts!) Once it was cleared up, they gave me an official letter confirming the camera's origin so that someone who bought the camera from me wouldn't have a problem getting it serviced.
     
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  7. beakhammer

    beakhammer Premium Member

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    Yeah, they are expensive. Fuji is the better deal. Repair isn't a problem with the old scool folding cameras, and nothing beats the color skopar lens on my Voigtlander Perkeo.
     
  8. Activatedfx

    Activatedfx Premium Member

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    A few from my rangefinder testing that didn't make it into those posts. These are all Yashica Electro GX, 40mm f/1.7 (shot at 1.7), and Kodak TMax 400 film. "Scanned" with A7ii and Tamron 90/2.5 Macro (52BB).

    DSC00138.jpg
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    DSC00140-2.jpg
    DSC00150.jpg
    DSC00156.jpg
     
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  9. denis.lincoln

    denis.lincoln Apartment Smells of Rich Mahogany

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    Looks like fun! Coupla thoughts:

    With the (over)exposure latitude print film and your preference to shoot everything wide open, you're fine with however your Canonet is operating as long as a: the shutter speeds are close and b: the rangefinder is aligned. :)

    If you're super worried about metering (see johnnypatience.com to see why you shouldn't be, at least on the overexposure side), you can check out a battery adapter that'll take that 357 battery and step the voltage down to 1.35v: Please login or register to view links They're overkill, really. I bought one and I think it's gone now with having sold that Canonet some time ago.

    I've been shooting mostly film most recently although a new job has curtailed most of that + my forum time/free time. It's good to see you're having fun with the Canonet! I wish mine hadn't been such a pain in the butt. Silver lining I bought an M4, then an M6...soooooo I don't need any more cameras. Ever. :p

    Here are a couple of shots from this summer when I took my boy to the Eastern Sierras on a fly fishing trip. Shot on Superia 400 through the M6 + 28mm Elmarit v4 scanned on my BEOON rig with X Pro 2. I like the color from Superia 400 for the most part but felt these looked better in BW...anyway, the last shot is in color with a v4 Summicron 50 and looks the way it looked in person after some color balancing:

    michael-5.jpg michael.jpg

    I like the scanned work you showed in the last post. I wouldn't mess with a flatbed scanner ever again after seeing those DSLR scans. You get way more out of the negs with your digital setup + some knowhow than any lab can provide.

    I scanned for awhile on an A7II and thought those files were really smooth and clean...too clean, almost. The Fuji adds some weird mosaic patterns when way zoomed in. Could be grain from the film, but *shrug*

    michael-4.jpg
     
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  10. Activatedfx

    Activatedfx Premium Member

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    Denis! You're back! Great shots!

    I've been following you on Insta, and I see that you are now a "Red Dot" owner. Congrats, dude! Jealous! If I can stick with the film thing, I think an M6 will be on my Xmas list, either with a 50 Lux or (more likely) 75 Lux. I think the 75/1.4 would be the "perfect" lens for my style of shooting.

    The Canonet arrived back from the seller this afternoon. He realigned the RF, and said all should be well now. He also said when adjusting things in the future, I should set the lens to Infinity and align the patches there. Every other tutorial said to do it at 3m, but this guy ONLY works on Canonet's, so I'll go with his advice. I'll be running a few rolls through it this weekend/week, and will post when I have the film back.

    Re: scanning. My Tamron only goes to 1:2, so I had to scan 2 35mm frames per A7 frame. I can't imagine the detail if I'd been able to go 1:1. That said, I found out there's a 2x extender that can be used to achieve 1:1 with the Tam, and it can also be used as an "extension tube" by unscrewing the glass group. (So no extra glass to reduce the IQ.) Ordering one of those for my next scanning session!
     
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  11. beakhammer

    beakhammer Premium Member

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    Dennis, I have to agree with the no-free-lunch conclusion that Digital Camera/Macro Lens scanning is probably the best bet (short of buying your own drum-scanner or Noritsu). I looked into the big 120 version of my 35mm film scanner and find that a number of people are complaining that these machines are failing fairly soon after purchase, which might explain the recent price drops. Anyhow, whatever way you digitize film, it's all about the software and post-processing anyway. I still find the jumbo epson flatbeds tempting, but I suspect they fall short of a good camera-scan for a lot of images. I think most of my own color balance problems are due to ignorance. I read a recent article about how to get to a neutral color balance as a starting point that my be a big help.

    I like the Leica.

    As you can tell I am shooting a lot of 120 film, but am also re-orienting to 35mm. It's all about using the right film stocks for each format.

    Coming soon, 4x5.
     
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  12. beakhammer

    beakhammer Premium Member

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    I have been calibrating focus-scales to lenses for my 3D printed large-format camera and find that getting infinity right is essential. Once you have infinity you can check that a very close distance is correct as well. Only when I have both infinity and focus at around 2 meters set right can I be sure that the scale is in the correct place. I believe that calibrating a range finder is a lot like positioning a focus scale. The adjustments are tiny, and crucial, at the infinity end of things (but the DOF is also deep, so it can be hard to confirm the correct point). If you are even a small bit short of infinity you are out of luck. In the close-focus range the scale is expanded, and DOF is short, so it is easier to pinpoint where you should be (and small errors have smaller consequences to overall performance). If both near and far are sharp when the measured distance matches the scale as well as the RF patch opinions about distance, then you are all set.
     
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  13. Tim Sewell

    Tim Sewell Well-Known Member

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    So since I posted here about my new Epson 550 I came across a decent deal on a Nikon Coolscan LS-IV ED, which far outstrips the Epson for 35mm. I also invested in a couple of tanks etc and a bunch of chemicals. Now, the weather hasn't been too great around here recently and I've been snowed under by work and kids, plus my OM-2S suffered sudden death syndrome so all in all I didn't have any finished rolls of b&w to subject to development (22 years since I last wielded a developing tank!). I was delighted, therefore, when I came across a roll of 35mm HP5 that I remembered I had bought together with the Lomo camera I gave my wife for Christmas a few years ago. I remembered she shot a lot of pictures of the children etc, but then had lost interest and never gotten round to sending the films off for processing. Eagerly, then, I ran it through some HC-110 this evening and stood nervously counting down the minutes until I could dollop in some wetting agent and yank it out.

    It appears that another roll of 135 HP5 must have been bought at some point, as the only images on this it were the frame numbers.

    Hey ho. Still, at least it was a good dry (wet) run!
     
  14. Tim Sewell

    Tim Sewell Well-Known Member

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    Bergger Panchro 400 in HC-110. Olympus OM-1MD w/ OM Zuiko 50mm 1.8.

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  15. Tim Sewell

    Tim Sewell Well-Known Member

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    As above.

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  16. beakhammer

    beakhammer Premium Member

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    Here is a sample of Lomography 200 color print film. I like the Lomography 100 a lot better, because it has much finer grain, but both the 100 and 200 Lomography film actually can produce some appealing colors. This frame was shot with a Rollei 35SE, which has a 40mm/2.8 Zeiss Sonar lens. Lomo 200 print film.jpg
     
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  17. Rhaegar

    Rhaegar Well-Known Member

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    I'm struggling with exposure. Quite a few of my pics coming out darker than intended. I really should start taking notes so as to be able to critique and improve. But here is one taken on the Nikon FM3a that I like

    [​IMG]
     
  18. beakhammer

    beakhammer Premium Member

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    You can start by just over-exposing everything. If your prints are too dark that would be because the negatives were under-exposed and there wasn't enough light to burn the details into the negative. A transparent negative makes a dark print. You want your negs to look dark and dense so that they can provide you with bright areas in your prints. It is difficult to over-expose print film, whether color or B&W. You have 3 stops of over-exposure latitude, and maybe 2 stops of underexposure latitude, so it pays to over-expose with the better print films. It is very hard to blow out the highlights on print film, compared to digital. Slide film is a totally different story. You have to get it spot on.

    It is common for the light meters on older cameras to underexpose by one or two stops. Often a technician can adjust the light meter, but you can also just compare your camera readings to an accurate meter and then compensate. If you have trouble remembering just set the ISO to a lower number to fool the camera into increasing the exposure.

    There are also processing tricks for getting less-contrasty negatives, which may provide you with more latitude as well.

    A lot of my cameras don't have built-in meters, so I very often use a hand-held meter, or even sometimes a proper hand-held spot meter. I pay more attention when I use a hand-held meter and almost always get better results. With a hand-held meter you look at the scene and make a conscious choice of where you want to meter neutral gray. This means your exposure is almost always more intelligently chosen than when you use a built-in averaging meter, or even a matrix meter.

    Notes might help, but whether or not you take notes, it is paying attention that makes a difference. When I use a hand-held meter to measure the blue sky, or green grass in sunshine, call that reading neutral gray, and find that this works really well, I will remember that the next time I need to evaluate a similar scene. Particular settings don't really matter; it's the number of stops between pure black and bright white in any given scene that matters. A modern film like Portra or T-Max can handle all but the most extreme dynamic range, if you pick the mid-tone out of the range and meter for that you are usually OK. When the contrast gets really extreme you may have to make a call on whether to sacrifice the shadows to pure blackness, or let the highlights burn out.

    I like to work with accurate exposures, but it is better to over-expose when in doubt.
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2017 at 3:40 PM
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  19. beakhammer

    beakhammer Premium Member

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    Portra 160 shot in a Zeiss Ikon Ikoflex with 75mm/3.5 Novar Anastigmat lens. This frame was cropped from the middle of a much larger 6x6 negative. I shot the film directly with a Fuji X-E2 and Micro-Nikkor 55mm/2.8 macro lens on an extension tube and then cropped the resulting shot a bit more. Inverted with ColorPerfect in Photoshop and processed further in Lightroom. This old thrift store TLR continues to impress me.
    Ikoflex Cat sm.jpg
     
  20. beakhammer

    beakhammer Premium Member

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    Portra 160 shot in a Zeiss Ikon Ikoflex with 75mm/3.5 Novar Anastigmat lens. This frame was cropped from the middle of a much larger 6x6 negative. I shot the film directly with a Fuji X-E2 and Micro-Nikkor 55mm/2.8 macro lens on an extension tube and then cropped the resulting shot a bit more. Inverted with ColorPerfect in Photoshop and processed further in Lightroom. This old thrift store TLR continues to impress me.
    View attachment 115487
     

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